What’s your money story?

During one summer break, a father told his son to get a summer job, with the intention that his son learned about hard-work. The boy didn’t know what kind of job he should apply to, and the father quickly suggested a fast-food restaurant. The boy made $100 after one week of hard-work a the burger joint. The father was proud of his son, but the son didn’t enjoy working at a burger joint.
 
One week later, the boy quitted his job. He started printing out flyers to teach tennis lessons for younger kids. He rode his bike and posted those flyers around the neighborhood. Little that he knew, he got 5 clients that paid him $20/hour for a group tennis lesson. At that moment, the boy realized that he collected $100 in one hour instead of one week. And, his income did not depend on one source, his employer.
 
Unfortunately, I am not that boy.  I learned about the importance of multiple of sources and thinking on a bigger level at later age. But, that’s the story that changes my whole perspective on money and hard work.

What is my money story?

When I was young but old enough to remember (maybe around seven years or older), I was the thrift one among all the kids in my family. I am not sure what impacted my perspective on money, but I was a hoarder. I like to save money and spend none if possible. I remembered my brothers and sister withdrew some money out from their savings to buy brand name clothes, toys, or to support their hobbies. Unfortunately, I didn’t spend any money on those things. My parents felt sorry and bought me some stuff because I just never asked for toys or clothes.

Once I graduated from college, just like most people, I believe in getting a good job, save in 401K, buy a few stocks on my own and hoping I will be able to accumulate enough for retirement. I know I can do this because I’ve been living a thrift life since I was seven years old. 🙂

I’m aware that I always have the itch to be an entrepreneur. Maybe that’s because my dad has always been a business owner, but I’ve never invested any money or time to learn to be one.

Unfortunately, my great job, which I relied on, went through new management. Our 1-year-old son is going through chemo treatment (he will finish his chemo by March 2018). Things changed. Luckily, I remembered the story that I told you earlier about the boy who teaches tennis. I realized it is time to take more control over my financial situation, not relying on just one employer.

That’s why I put my time and energy to help you, especially if you are a parent, to realize the importance of multiple sources of income.

Take Action Immediately

Don’t wait until you have no choice.

Take action now because everything that you do will have to start from zero.

Please share this article with your friend or someone who can benefit from it.

 

Photo by Maryna Davyda on Unsplash

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